UX News

A look at what's going on in the field of user experience.

Discovery on a Budget: Part II

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

Screenshot of a spreadsheet with quotes about Facebook usage

Welcome to the second installment of the “Discovery on a Budget” series, in which we explore how to conduct effective discovery research when there is no existing data to comb through, no stakeholders to interview, and no slush fund to draw upon. In part 1 of this series, we discussed how it is helpful to articulate what you know (and what you assume) in the form of a problem hypothesis. We also covered strategies for conducting one of the most affordable and effective research methods: user interviews. In part 2 we will discuss when it’s beneficial to introduce a second, competing problem hypothesis to test against the first. We will also discuss the benefits of launching a “fake-door” and how to conduct an A/B test when you have little to no traffic.

A quick recap In part 1 I conducted the first round of discovery research for my budget-conscious (and fictitious!) startup, Candor Network. The original goal for Candor Network was to provide a non-addictive social media platform that users would pay for directly. I articulated that goal in the form of a problem hypothesis:

Continue reading...


Design Like a Teacher

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

In 2014, the clinic where I served as head of communications and digital strategy switched to a new online patient portal, a change that was mandated by the electronic health record (EHR) system we used. The company that provides the EHR system held several meetings for the COO and me to learn the new tool and provided materials to give to patients to help them register for and use the new portal.

As the sole person at my clinic working on any aspect of user experience, I knew the importance of knowing the audience when implementing an initiative like the patient portal. So I was skeptical of the materials provided to the patients, which assumed a lot of knowledge on their part and focused on the cool features of the portal rather than on why patients would actually want to use it.

Continue reading...


My Accessibility Journey: What I’ve Learned So Far

, A List Apart: The Full Feed

Last year I gave a talk about CSS and accessibility at the stahlstadt.js meetup in Linz, Austria. Afterward, an attendee asked why I was interested in accessibility: Did I or someone in my life have a disability?

I’m used to answering this question—to which the answer is no—because I get it all the time. A lot of people seem to assume that a personal connection is the only reason someone would care about accessibility.

Continue reading...


What I’ve learned in 2017.

, UX Collective - Medium

Few months ago in my first Medium post I shared with you a short story where I explained how I end up with coding as a designer, why I started care about it and why some of the designers should care about it too…When I was reading it few days ago I started thinking about all the progress I’ve made and things I’ve learned through past twelve months. I decided to write about it a short story. It might be some sort of follow up to my first medium post so make sure to check it in the meantime if you want.

So, without further ado… Here’s what I’ve learned in 2017.

Continue reading...


Measuring the ROI for UX in an Enterprise Organization, Part 1

, UXmatters

By Burcu S. Bakioglu, Ben Basilan and JonDelina ‘JD’ Buckley

To stay relevant and avoid disruption through advances in technology or globalization, more and more organizations have embraced user-centered design and UX research methods. Thus, after years of fighting for a seat at the decision-making table, it is becoming more common for UX professionals to find one there. Still, executives often ask UX teams to quantify the value and return on investment (ROI) of their UX efforts. While calculating the ROI of User Experience can be challenging for consumer products and services, it can be truly daunting in enterprise organizations.

Continue reading...


Instacart App: A Guerrilla Usability Test

, UX Collective - Medium

How I discovered pain points and polished the designInstacart promises to let us say goodbye to all the hassles we face while doing grocery shopping and it does bring us much closer to an effortlessly convenient “future of food.”

I’m very impressed with the app the Instacart team has built. In a handful of guerrilla user experience tests I did this past week, though, I discovered that there’s still a few opportunities for improvement.

Continue reading...


So You’re a Product Design Intern in Silicon Valley, Now What?

, UX Collective - Medium

KPCB Fellows Fam circa 2017Honestly, I’ve always hated career advice articles. Their soft universality, annoying obviousness, and general ambiguity makes the majority of them about as applicable as a dry glue stick. Of course you know to ask questions when you don’t understand something, and be enthusiastic about what you’re working on — that’s how you got to where you are right now: about to take your place on a kick-ass design team in the bay area.

You don’t need general internship best-practices. You need some explicit, actionable, 24 karat advice specifically on how you can repeatedly outperform everyone’s expectations of you as a Product Design Intern at an innovative technology company in Silicon Valley.

Continue reading...


Measuring the Value of UX

, UXmatters

By Tim Dixon

What do I mean by value? The value of a UX design or digital project equates with the impact the project makes.

Continue reading...


Conference Review: O’Reilly Design Conference 2017

, UXmatters

By Pabini Gabriel-Petit and Krispian Emert

The overarching theme of the second annual O’Reilly Design Conference was “Prepare to Design the Future.” The conference convened March 20–22, 2017, at the historic Westin St. Francis Hotel, on Union Square in San Francisco. Monday, March 20, provided a full day of tutorials, while the main conference took place on March 21 and 22. O’Reilly Media delivered a better conference experience than in 2016 and again provided very high-quality content.

Continue reading...